I would recommend Ram Roads to anyone

I started learning to drive with Richard when he was with the AA. We built up an excellent rapport and I stayed with him when he set up “Ram Roads”. I passed my test and then did “pass plus” with Richard and have had a couple of two hour refresher drives with him since. Richard offers a professional friendly service. He is flexible with appointments and always helpful. Lessons are always a full hour of one to one instruction. He is an experienced and confident instructor who immediately puts you at ease. He is understanding and considerate at all stages of the learning process. I feel that I was lucky to find Richard and have told all my friends how good he is. I would recommend Ram Roads to anyone of any age or ability for any aspect of driving tuition.

Emma Miller.

A Guide for Family and Friends in Driving Lessons Havering

An essential guide for family and friends in learning to drive is to remember always that “Practice makes perfect.” So, when your driving instructor thinks that you’re ready after a course on driving lessons Havering , why not get more practice with your family or a friend. Think of it that a family member, a friend or a relative will provide you with an environment which is more friendly and conducive for your learning as a beginner.

As perfection could be attained in constant practice, it’s actually ensuring you also to pass your driving tests and eventually get a full driving licence. Your family, friend or relative accompanying you during your practice will definitely give some ease and confidence, thus giving the learning process more effective.

But remember also that a Learner who drives a car must have a valid provisional licence. So, never get into driving your car with your family or friend without this licence. You, as a learner driver needs to be supervised by a driver from your family with at least 21 years of age who holds a full driving licence not less than three years.

It’s worth bearing in mind that honest comment, be it positive or negative, is actually shaping a learner to become a good and responsible driver in the future. A dishonest comment on the other hand would eventually incur damage to his/her promising driving career.

Therefore, don’t make an irony by your dishonest comment, rather you have to be very honest because the recipient of it is a family member or a best friend or a relative. Think of it that his/her success is also your success per se.

Also remember that you’ll need an insurance when you drive a vehicle. So, don’t  be an idiot by leaving your home without this. Today, you can already have an insurance policy that will allow you to drive almost any vehicle. When you need it quick, you can have it as short as one week.

Drive the car of your parents or the vehicle of your grandparents. You can also drive the car of your friend or relative without any risk to their insurance by taking out a policy for each vehicle if you need it.

Find the quietest roads possible for your initial road sessions. Your friend/family probably has already learned the correct traffic and road procedures from the professional instructor during their time in driving school. Your job as a relative, friend or family member accompanying with a learner driver will be to provide good feedback while he/she practises these procedures at wheel.

Accurate lane driving and positioning for turns, good signal timing, and good road sense are the basic ingredients for passing the government road test. These will be learned more effectively by driving around the block with somebody who provides good feedback than by hours of random driving on highway or streets.

On the other hand, a co-driver who allows the novice driver to get away with faults or who provides poor feedback may hold back the learning process considerably. So, as a co-driver you don’t have to hold back any negative but honest comments. It has the same negative effect if you’re too positive in your comments but actually far from reality.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM

Practice Driving Hints From Top Driving Instructor Havering

There are some essential practice driving hints from the best driving instructor Havering that learner drivers must learn so that you can surely attain your goal to learn fast, get passing marks in your driving tests and eventually acquire a full driving licence in the United Kingdom (UK). There are hints which are new that sounds an irony for you but these are actually useful in learning faster than expected.

These hints are as follows:

(1.)  Don’t carry passengers. This doesn’t mean that you’re being prohibited by any rules to have one or more passengers in your car whilst you’re practising to drive a vehicle. Be aware that there’s no law that prohibits you to have a passenger in the backseat of your car.

However, it’s not usually a good idea to carry extra passengers onboard your car during your practice because it could affect your driving concentration. But if really you want them with you inside your car as extra passengers, have them sit where they won’t restrict or block your view on the mirrors of your car.

(2.)  Stay alert. There are some beginners or novice who may give the impression of being too confident and in complete control of the vehicle but in truth they’re totally unprepared in dealing with some sudden or quick change in conditions and very reliant on you as his/her co-driver. He/she wants your guidance and even assistance in controlling the vehicle. Always be ready to react and anticipate problems.

(3.)  Communicate clearly. As a co-driver, give well the learner some directions in advance and try to always use exactly the same terms – don’t say “accelerator” one time, and then the next, you call it “gas pedal.”

(4.)  Don’t feed the beginner with everything at once. For example, a simple right turn will involve several steps such as signaling, checking mirrors and blind areas, road positioning, braking and checking the flow of vehicles around before turning or steering. Expecting a beginner to correctly follow all of these is asking too much from him/her.

(5.)  As a co-driver, don’t get too excited during practice session. This will communicate itself quickly to the learner driver and it could make performance too difficult.

(6.)  Don’t overload. A big part of being a co-driver is reminding the learner driver to often check the traffic and to signal and to bring attention to potential hazards. But remember that everything you say is also a distraction for the learner driver. Be truthful in your comments and don’t let the learner get into situations which he or she can’t anymore handle.

(7.)  Stop and discuss. When your friend or family makes a mistake, he/she might not clear as to what went wrong with his/her driving. Discussing or explaining whilst you’re on the move isn’t effective. The beginner is too busy driving! Whilst the mistake is still fresh in his/her memory, stop as soon as possible and then sort out the problem. Never jump on each mistake or make a big thing of it because this would affect the learner’s concentration and confidence in driving.

(8.)  Don’t clash with the teaching of his/her professional driving instructor. If your learner is doing something which you think isn’t correct and he/she will maintain that his/her driving instructor has been teaching this way, you may talk to the driving instructor later about that mistake. Remember that there are instances that learner drivers wrongly interpret the directions of their driving instructor.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Driving Instructors Havering Tips: What To Do If You Get Stuck in the Snow?

What will you do if you get stuck in the snow? Probably, you can answer this with your own practical mind, but it’s entirely different when we speak of experience as our basis of action. The experts and experienced driving instructors Havering could tell you that if you get stuck in snow, you don’t need to keep trying to spin the wheels of your car in an attempt to gain grip. This action will only dig you deeper in snow.

So, what will you do? Are you going to wait until spring or summer? Absolutely, no! Just do turn your steering wheel clockwise and then counter-clockwise so your car’s wheels will move from side to side several times. This will help push the snow out of the way.

Then, you must be gentle with the gas pedal. The slower you press it, the better. This will allow your tyres to take more grip on the snow-covered road. Move the snow away from the wheels by using anything or whatever you’ll have to hand. You can even use your hands if you can’t find any stuff to be used for the task.

To help your tyres gain more grip, you can put gravel, sand or grit in the wheels’ path. Then, shift from forwards to reverse and back again and then repeat the same shift if it’s still needed. Every time you’re in gear, remember to press the gas pedal very gently. This will create a rocking backwards and forward motion. This will  help your tyres to get a strong grip.

As a last resort, you can also use the floor mats of your car. Put it in front of the tyres. But be aware that the mats may be destroyed.  You can also pull branches or weeds off the side of the road. You can lay them down for more traction of your tyres. Remember that the wheels could sometimes spin out suddenly whatever you put down for traction. However, if your effort doesn’t work, you can use one or both of the following steps:

(1.)  You can sprinkle sand or salt in front of the tyres. The salt can help to melt the snow. The rock salt is more preferable to use. The sand can also provide traction. If you also have extra anti-freeze fluid in your car, you can use it because it can help melt the snow.

(2.)  Straighten the front wheels by turning the steering wheel to the direction that you want. It’s limited only by any obstructions such as signs, hydrants, other vehicles etc. remember that the wheels that are straightened will make it much easier for the car to move  or getting unstuck than if they’re turned.

Other advice from experts includes even the prevention of any negative experiences driving in snow. You should first check on the latest local news about heavy snow forecast before travelling. If the forecast tells you that a heavy snowfall continues, but being pushed to travel by circumstances which you couldn’t avoid, you must have to drive your car on snow-covered road, then  you should take with you the following:

(1.)  a shovel
(2.)  hi-vis vest
(3.)  some extra warm clothes.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM

More Young Drivers Drink and Drive

Young and novice drivers are supposed to behave well and follow road rules because they’re still inexperienced behind the wheel resulting in their involvement in many road fatalities. However, a recent study shows that most young drivers are currently violating the law by taking alcoholic drinks and then take control of their vehicles on the road whilst under the influence of alcohol.

According to the study, the least experienced group of motorists in Britain are the most likely to drink alcoholic drinks, and even when they’re under the influence of it, they still drive their cars. This is actually a sorry state, a kind of ironic behaviour of young generation in a country known worldwide of its law-abiding people.

Even official figures could show young drivers less than 25 years old are more than 50 % likely to get behind the steering wheel whilst they’re under the influence of alcoholic drinks. So, this is enough evidence that the British government will take action to intensify more of its campaign against drink-driving. Because if these figures continue, it could also mean that we allow the carnage of our young people in numerous road fatalities across Britain.

The figures published by the Association of Chief Police Officers in the United Kingdom (UK) could show that more than 28,220 young drivers under the age of 25 years were breath tested in Britain at the annual anti-drink-drive campaign during the Christmas season. Out of that number, 6.33 %  or 1,788 young drivers failed the breath test which means they really drink before they get behind the steering wheel.

On the other hand, more drivers over 25 years of age were stopped by the police and they were breath- tested as part of the anti-drink-drive campaign during the Christmas season. It was found out that with 74,327 drivers stopped and checked, there were only 3.94 % or 4,042 failed the breath test which means they really drink before they get behind the steering wheel.

It can be recalled that in the year 2014, despite roadside breath tests conducted were only fewer, the police forces used an approach which was uniquely intelligence-led aimed to target young and old drivers who are more likely to get into drink-driving.

Then, this approach was able to see the rise in the number of young drivers who were tested positive of alcohol in their breath. Their number actually rose from 1,675 in the year 2013 to 1,788  last year during the Christmas anti-drink-drive campaign.

Royal Society for the Prevention of Accidents (RoSPA) Head of Road Safety Kevin Clinton said that whilst it’s good news that the policemen are adopting an approach which is intelligence-led to target drivers most likely to have drunk, it’s also necessary to maintain the overall number of breath tests.

Clinton emphasised that what’s also worrying is the rise of the number of young people who drive their cars whilst under the influence of alcohol. He said, every year there are around 250 people are killed in drink-drive accidents in Britain and it’s not just the drivers who suffer, but it’s often their passengers, pedestrians, the driver and passengers in other vehicles, motorcyclists or cyclists and the families of people involved in these accidents.

RAM Roads is one of the best driving schools Havering, enroll now!

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM

How to Drive a Car?

Some young people can’t wait to start learning how to drive a car as they could already sense the excitement and joy of being behind the steering wheel. Some of them are simply motivated to learn to drive because it’s a skill of life and being seen as more of a chore. There are also young individuals who intends to learn to drive standard and intensive driving lessons Havering out of necessity to get employed.

Regardless of your present situation, you may want to learn how to drive a vehicle at some point. So, this article will serve as your essential guide to provide you with the needed fundamental process which is combined with different tutorials found on the website of Driving Test Tips.

This tutorial can be used to gain an understanding on how to drive a car with a family member so that when you take professional driving lessons with a qualified driving instructor, you’ve already started harnessing your driving potential, making you to be a learner driver who’s easy to learn the driving lessons, so you and your instructor will be saving more efforts.

On the other hand, if you really intend to start learning to drive a vehicle on public roads in the United Kingdom (UK), initially, you’ll need to apply for a Provisional Driving Licence. You can do this three months before your seventeenth birthday, and then you’ll receive it in time to start driving when you’re reaching the age of 17 years old.

There are various methods for applying but you don’t need to apply a provisional driving licence if you intend to learn to drive a car on private land. There are certain driving schools that offer professional driving lessons for 16-year old learner driver that take place on private land.

Remember that before learning to drive a vehicle, you’ll first need to familiarise yourself with the basic functions and controls of the car. This is called as the Cockpit Drill. This will be completed by your driving instructor usually on your first driving lesson.

Cockpit Drill includes the following:

(1.)  Seat adjustments

(2.)  Use of foot pedals

(3.)  Hand controls including steering techniques and mirror adjustment.

Once you’ve gained a sufficient understanding and knowledge of the car’s controls, adjust your mirrors and seat correctly, then you can start learning to drive a car.

If you’re learning how to drive a car on a public road for the first time, choose a quiet, residential area and start on a straight road. Make sure your seat belt is on and the gears are in neutral.

Now start the car by turning the key clockwise until it stops for around two seconds and remove your hand from the ignition key.

Then put it on the first gear and release the hand brake. Now, what you’ll do is to drive the car off from a stationary position, and move to a short distance and then park the car in the same position to where it’s currently parked.

If anything’s approaching from behind you then you intend on waiting for that car to pass before moving off, be careful to signal only when it has already passed, because doing the signaling before it passes, may result that the driver of that car will be slowing down, flashing you out, or swerving. And all of these may result in your driving test failure.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM

Driving Instructor Havering Tips: Right Road Positioning

If you’re a learner driver at wheel who still finds it difficult to position your car at the right portion of the road, then you need more practice – a thorough exposure from fully qualified driving instructor Havering to actual driving as well as learn from the experience of drivers with full driving licence in the United Kingdom (UK) by talking to them in person, by phone, online or by going over some essential guides such as this sort of article you’re reading.

Right road positioning cannot be learnt overnight but it takes even years to master. You can ask an experienced and fully-licensed driver in UK or anywhere else, and he or she will answer you with the same thoughts. This is true, as there are instances of dangerous drivers who do not respect your plates such as “L” or “P” causing you to have more nerves or trauma.

The worse if this trauma of near collision experience will hold you back from going often to the road, especially the busier one, hindering your journey to the fulfillment of your dream driving career in the near future. You should resist against this fear. There are learner drivers, especially young ladies, who left driving schools and stopped learning to drive after a traumatic experience on the road.

But remember that the feeling of enjoyment driving your own car with all the freedom of being ready to go anytime anywhere and being equipped with the knowledge of the Highway Code and other applied road rules and regulations that you can learn more from your driving school, must motivate you to continue and have a steady focus to fulfill your dream.

You can also share your every bad experiences at wheel with your Mom and Dad especially if they’re also experienced drivers or holders of full driving licence because they can be very honest in sharing their own experiences at wheel and they can be your very reliable source of information and guidance about how you’ll become a responsible road user.

If your Mom and Dad also come from reputable driving schools when they were young, they’re definitely your guiding light to surmount some of your driving nerves. Remember that if your driving school is your good mentor, your parents can also be your first best teacher in laying the foundation of your promising driving career.

So, how to be in good road positioning makes up your nerves in cases of mistake. Because an error or your poor road positioning will be causing vision problems for other drivers because if they cannot see you until the last minute comes, this will consequently reduce their reaction time and may result their late braking or they will collide with other vehicles.

This could happen especially on faster roads such as the motorway or carriageway. The classic example is the notorious driver at the motorway middle lane who refuses to immediately budge despite clear road ahead and then ironically reacts with rage when he’s “undertaken.”

What you have to do is to keep safety as a priority. If you’re not sure about the right road positioning in any actual situation, remind yourself with the provisions of the Highway Code.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM


Driving Schools Havering : Where to Put the “L” Plates?

Before knowing where to put exactly the “L” plates, a learner driver must first have the knowledge what an “L” plate is all about or its significance and importance? Here’s a useful information that every driving schools Havering should teach to their students.

The bold letter “L” stands for “Learner.”  This plate displays a large single letter “L” which is bold and coloured red purposely to show other drivers at wheel as well as pedestrians around that a learner driver is the one in control of the car. Thus, they would be cautioned to be careful and be more considerate by giving that learner more space on the road to avoid collision or worse, ramming into them accidentally.

The “L” plate rules vary from penalty points to just a simple piece of advice from a police officer if you’re being stopped. This however depends on the police officer involved and the current situation on the road.

Now, the question is: Where to Put the “L” plates? Any driver in the United Kingdom (UK) in possession of a provisional driving licence must display “L” plates on the rear and front of his or her vehicle. You’re also permitted to display more than two “L” plates if really you can feel this could enhance safety on the road.

It’s also important for legal reasons to display “L” plates and to make sure they’re securely and properly fitted. Remember that failure to display “L” plates is an offence which will place three to six penalty points on your licence and a fine of £60.

However, there are no laws or rules specifying on where to put the “L” plates. The Highway Code in UK is just allowing for a certain degree of common sense on this matter. It only states that “L” plates must be placed in a conspicuous position on the front and rear of the vehicle. The word “must” means it’s not advisory but obligatory.

Therefore, a learner driver may display the “L” plates at the front and rear of the vehicle or may have additional “L” plates at the right and left side of the car. These additional “L” plates could be the result of your own initiative to enhance safety but not obligatory.

The “L” plates should be kept highly visible and clean, and to be placed on the body of the car particularly at the rear in a similar horizontal position to the brake lights because it’s always the most visible spot for the following motorists to see.

The “L” plates at the front should be mounted to the bonnet. So, It‘s not advisable to display “L” plates on the rear and front windscreen as this decreases visibility for the driver and the driving instructor or examiner. Placing the “L” plates on lower bumpers may result in its poor visibility to the other road users.

Placing the “L” plates

On the other hand, if a private vehicle with “L” plates, is to be used in taking a driving test, these plates must be clean and displayed conspicuously. Remember that a driving test examiner can refuse a driving test if the “L” plates are poorly maintained or not clearly and properly placed.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM

Driving Lessons Havering Tips: Parking the Car

When it comes to driving lessons Havering dealing with learner drivers can be frustrating for some instances due to often being a little slow in terms of moving off to the road and to the parking areas. This is due to the learner drivers’ unpredictability. So, it’s advisable to provide them with a longer reaction time on road situations by increasing your following distance or giving them enough space in the parking lots.

Specifically on parking the car to be done by a learner driver alongside the curb just a little farther from where he or she moved off. So, as a beginner, it’s often hard for you to judge where the curb is in relation to the vehicle. You can refer to the curb parking tutorial which offers some reference points aiding to find where the curb is to establish a more acceptable distance once you stop or park.

Before you move to the left to park your car, checking your mirrors needs to be completed. Start checking with the internal mirror, and next is the left door mirror. When moving off, there’s no need to signal that you’re going to the left if there are no pedestrians or other road users over there. But if there are, you should apply a signal that you’re going to the left.

Covering both the clutch and brake pedals with your feet whilst you’re going to park your car means that you’re just placing your feet over them but not pressing them down to function. This is just in preparation to stop. Covering the brake whilst you’re going to stop or park  your vehicle is essentially important in many situations because most often when a potentially hazardous situation develops such as in a busy pedestrian crossing, you’re always ready and prepared to react to avoid road accident.

Then, you can steer slowly to the left to move closer to the curb of the road. Just don’t steer too harshly because in doing so, there’s a higher possibility that you’ll hit the curb. To help with this, you can steer in sections. So drive to the left, straighten up, then again drive to the left, etc. This will keep the vehicle more parallel with the curb instead of keeping a harsh angle where the front of the car will be at risk if it hits the curb.

You can use the reference points which can be found in the curb parking tutorial, and just before stopping the car, you can press the clutch pedal to the floor. Then, gently press the brake pedal until you stop. Keep the pedals and your feet as they are, pull the handbrake up and then select neutral. You can remove now your feet from the pedals and make sure to switch off or cancel the signal if applied at that time.

Parking your car close to the curb or in parking lot of a supermarket definitely needs more practice for novice drivers. A parking lot of this sort is known to be a better area to practise as it already has the complete markings and curves for you to harness your driving skill.

Ram Roads

39 Ravel Gardens

Aveley, Essex RM15 4NS

Åland Islands

Phone: 07841 978 971

Monday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Tuesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Wednesday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Thursday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM
Friday Closed
Saturday Closed
Sunday 8:30 AM – 7:30 PM

Student Passes Driving Test

1